Art & Technology

Course: Art 1-2
Instructor: Chris Culver

Course Description
In this course, students will deepen their understanding that they are part of the Divine Design. They will learn the elements of design and how to observe the “Beauty of this World.” In this course we study Christian Character based master artists, such as Rembrandt and other contemporary artists like Greg Olsen and others known to portray Christian values. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to complete assignments during class time, keep them organized, and remember their sketchbooks. To support your student, please consider checking your student’s sketchbooks and giving encouragement.

Course: Art 3-4
Instructor: Chris Culver

Course Description
The pre-requisite to this course is Art 1-2. Students will continue to build the skills learned Art 1-2. This course assists the student in correct preparation and organization of an art portfolio. Emphasis is placed on the individual’s strongest art work. Students will be given an opportunity to refine their personal strengths in art as they build their art portfolio.

Course: Art 7
Instructor: Chris Culver

Course Description
In this course, students will learn that they are part of the Divine Design. They will learn the elements of design and how to observe the “Beauty of this World.” They will be introduced to many mediums and styles of creating art images. They will learn that through partnering with the spirit they may all become wonderful artists. Students will develop their talents through persistent efforts in drawing and painting. They will each have a personal sketchbook provided by our school, where weekly homework will be required. Students will be introduced to Art history as associated with our Christian Timleline of history.The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to complete assignments during class time, keep them organized, and remember their sketchbooks. To support your student, please consider checking your student’s sketchbooks and giving encouragement.

Course: Art 8
Instructor: Chris Culver

Course Description
In this course, students will increase their understanding that they are part of the Divine Design. They will continue to learn the elements of design introduced in Art 7 and how to observe the “Beauty of this World.” They will continue to refine their skills in various mediums and styles that were introduced in Art 7 of creating art images. They will learn that through partnering with the spirit they may all become wonderful artists. The students will develop their talents through persistent efforts in drawing and painting. They each have personal sketchbooks provided by our school, where weekly homework is required.Additonal artists will be introduced to the studnes that areassociated with our Christian Timeline of hisotry. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to complete assignments during class time, keep them organized, and remember their sketchbooks. To support your student, please consider checking your student’s sketchbooks and giving encouragement.

Course: Computer Skills 7
Instructor: Alex DeBirk

Course Description
Basic introduction to Microsoft Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. Continued Keyboarding instruction in technique and proficiency.

Course: Social Media Literacy 8
Instructor: Mattie Smith

Course Description
The Social Media Literacy course uses an evidence-based curriculum with a simulated social media platform to provide students with an immersive educational experience. The classwork pulls from the social media successes and failures of real users, building a curriculum that addresses topics relevant to teenagers today. The simulated platform will give students the chance to apply what they learn as they practice principles related to topics such as online privacy, fake news, finding followers, scams and cyber bullying.

Course: Computer Technology
Instructor: Jeff Hymas

Course Description
The computer technology class at American Heritage School is a semester-long class, and is a required class to graduate. It is meant to provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary to function in a world full of technology. Students will become familiar with basic computer hardware, and the Windows 10 operating system. Students will also learn the purposes, and functionalities of three applications in the Microsoft Office Suite; Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Throughout the semester students will gain an understanding of the power of technology, and how it can be used to bless the lives of others.

Course: Introduction to Computer Science
Instructor: Joseph Walker

Course Description
This course will introduce you to the field of computer science and the fundamentals of computer programming. Introduction to Computer Science is specifically designed for students with no prior programming experience, and taking this course does not require a background in Computer Science.

Course: AP Computer Science Principles
Instructor: Austin Hill

Course Description
This course will introduce you to the field of computer science and the fundamentals of computer programming. Introduction to Computer Science is specifically designed for students with no prior programming experience, and taking this course does not require a background in Computer Science.

Course: Yearbook Production
Instructor: Dave Buer

Course Description
Most of the Yearbook Production class will be focused on creating a yearbook for American Heritage school. Before working on the yearbook, however, students will learn and practice principles of design and typography. This will allow students to acquire design vocabulary, and guide their creativity in ways that are also visually appealing. In this class students will:
• Understand and put into practice principles of design.
• Positively collaborate with class members.
• Create the most awesome yearbook AHS has ever seen

Foreign Language

Course: ASL 1
Instructor: Rachel Atchison

Course Description
This course will cover the basic skills that are used in American Sign Language (ASL). These include but are not limited to vocabulary, grammar, finger spelling, numbers, Gospel signs and other terminology. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about Deaf culture and history.

Course: ASL 2
Instructor: Preston Gudmunson

Course Description
American Sign Language (ASL) is used by over 250,000 in the United States and throughout the world. In this course, students will learn how to communicate in this language buildling on the vocabulary, grammar, finger spelling, numbers, Gospel signs and other terminology learned in ASL 1.

Course: ASL 3
Instructor: Preston Gudmunson

Course Description
American Sign Language (ASL) is used by over 250,000 in the United States and throughout the world. In this course, students will learn how to communicate in this language through vocabulary, grammar, finger spelling, numbers, Gospel signs and other terminology. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about Deaf culture and history.

Course: French 1
Instructor: Mattie Smith

Course Description
In this course, students will learn religious French (including how to pray and read scriptures in French); French history, literature, culture, and geography; and verbs, vocabulary, and grammar for the following topics: language basics, greetings and introductions, work and school, shopping, travel, past and future, friends and social life, and dining and vacation through the Foundation for American Christian Education methodology, the Standard Works and words of modern prophets and apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and teacher-led, textbook-guided exercises. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through individualized Rosetta Stone “dynamic immersion” language assessments, compositions, oral and written exams, multi-sensory activities, posters, presentations, and class plays. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to complete individualized Rosetta Stone “dynamic immersion” activities at home. To support your student, please consider helping them memorize French verb conjugations and vocabulary and giving them opportunities to speak to you in only French (even if you do not understand French!).

Course: French 2
Instructor: Mattie Smith

Course Description
In this course, students learn further about French culture and the basic principles of speaking, reading, and writing French through in-class grammatical, verbal, written, and vocabulary practice. Students learn to pray in French and sing French hymns daily. Most homework is done in class so the teacher can assist you with it. Students also participate in fun cultural events such as crèpe making, a Boules tournament, celebrating Toussaint and Noel, and trying new French pastries.

Course: French 3
Instructor: Mattie Smith

Course Description
In this course, students learn about French culture and the more advanced principles of speaking, reading, and writing French through in-class grammatical, verbal, written, and vocabulary practice. Students learn to pray in French and sing French hymns daily. Most homework is done in class so the teacher can assist you with it. Students also participate in fun cultural events such as crèpe making, a Boules tournament, celebrating Toussaint and Noel, and trying new French pastries.

Course: Spanish 1
Instructor: Jeff Beck

Course Description
In Spanish 1, students will review and solidify the foundational principles of Spanish grammar and pronunciation through in-class grammatical, verbal, written, and vocabulary practice. This level will focus on strengthening a student’s ability to perform simple tasks in the present tense such as introduce themselves, discuss their likes and dislikes, tell time, pray, shop for clothes, ask for directions, etc. As such, vocabulary will be an essential part of the course, as for any beginning or intermediate language class. Students will be exposed periodically to cultural topics through their language study; language and culture are interconnected in many ways. However, the bulk of their cultural learning will stem from their yearly Cultural Project for which they have a wide variety of possible topics. The students will present what they learn to the rest of the class. To support your student, please consider making the computer available at home for easy dictionary access as well as access to the class website to verify assignments, keep up with the class calendar, and take advantage of other online resources discussed in class. The Spanish classes at American Heritage are an opportunity for students to progress in communicative competence. Communicative competence requires an understanding of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. For students to progress in their understanding of the Spanish language they will actively participate in engaging, meaningful speaking, and writing activities. Along with those activities, students will be exposed to, and discuss elements of Spanish culture. In this class students will do the following:
• Acquire communication skills in the Spanish language
• Expand their perspective of the Spanish speaking world
• Participate in the local Spanish speaking community

Course: Spanish 2
Instructor: Jeff Beck

Course Description
In any subject, but especially in foreign languages, repetition is the mother of learning. As such, Spanish 2 will review, solidify, and build on the principles learned in Spanish 1. While most of the class will still focus on the present tense, students will expand their ability to include a wider scope of application for the present tense as well as some of its more complicated structures. Sentence structure will become more educated and mature as students learn to use object pronouns and other grammatical devices to both simplify and enrich their spoken and written Spanish. Students will continue to build vocabulary while having the opportunity to review key vocabulary from Spanish 1. Students will be exposed periodically to cultural topics through their language study; language and culture are interconnected in many ways. However, the bulk of their cultural learning will stem from their yearly Cultural Project for which they have a wide variety of possible topics. The students will present what they learn to the rest of the class. To support your student, please consider making the computer available at home for easy dictionary access as well as access to the class website to verify assignments, keep up with the class calendar, and take advantage of other online resources discussed in class. The Spanish classes at American Heritage are an opportunity for students to progress in communicative competence. Communicative competence requires an understanding of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. For students to progress in their understanding of the Spanish language they will actively participate in engaging, meaningful speaking, and writing activities. Along with those activities, students will be exposed to, and discuss elements of Spanish culture. In this class students will do the following:
• Acquire communication skills in the Spanish language
• Expand their perspective of the Spanish speaking world
• Participate in the local Spanish speaking community

Course: Spanish 3
Instructor: Jeff Beck

Course Description
In this course, students learn in depth about Spanish culture and the most advanced principles of speaking, reading, and writing Spanish through in class grammatical, verbal, written, and vocabulary practice that are offered in high school. The Spanish classes at American Heritage are an opportunity for students to progress in communicative competence. Communicative competence requires an understanding of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. For students to progress in their understanding of the Spanish language they will actively participate in engaging, meaningful speaking, and writing activities. Along with those activities, students will be exposed to, and discuss elements of Spanish culture. In this class students will do the following:
• Acquire communication skills in the Spanish language
• Expand their perspective of the Spanish speaking world
• Participate in the local Spanish speaking community

Math

Course: Algebra 1
Instructors: Camille Heiner, Shawnell Larsen, Gail Long, Jeff Meade, Sam Wood

Course Description
Specific topics covered include the following: arithmetic of and evaluation of expressions involving signed numbers, exponents and roots, properties of the real numbers, absolute value and equations and inequalities involving absolute value, scientific notation, unit conversions, solution of equations in one unknown and solution of simultaneous equations, the algebra of polynomials and rational expressions, word problems requiring algebra for their solution (such as uniform motion and coin problems), graphical solution of simultaneous equations, Pythagorean theorem, algebraic proofs, functions and functional notation, solution of quadratic equations via factoring and completing the square, direct and inverse variation, and exponential growth, computation of the perimeter and areas of two-dimensional regions, computation of the surface area and volume of a wide variety of geometric solids, and statistics and probability. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Course: Algebra 2
Instructors: Camille Heiner, Shawnell Larsen, Gail Long, Jeff Meade, Sam Wood

Course Description
Algebra 2 covers a considerable amount of geometry. Specific algebra topics covered include the following: graphical solution to simultaneous equations, scientific notation, radicals, roots of quadratic equations including complex roots, properties of the real numbers, inequalities and systems of inequalities, logarithms and antilogarithms, exponential equations, basic trigonometric functions, algebra of polynomials, vectors, polar and rectangular coordinate systems, and a wide spectrum of word problems requiring algebra to solve. Considerable time is spent developing geometric concepts and writing proof outlines. Students completing Algebra 2 will have studied the equivalent of one semester of informal geometry. Applications to other subjects such as physics and chemistry as well as “real-world” problems are covered including gas law, force vector, chemical mixture, percent markups, etc. Set theory, probability and statistics, and other topics are also treated. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Course: AP Calculus
Instructor: Jeff Meade

Course Description
Calculus treats all the topics normally covered in an Advanced Placement AB-level calculus program, as well as many of the topics required for a BC-level program. The text begins with a thorough review of those mathematical concepts and skills required for calculus. In the early problem sets, students practice “setting up” word problems they will later encounter as calculus problems. The problem sets contain multiple-choice and conceptually-oriented problems similar to those found on the Advanced Placement examination. Whenever possible, students are provided an intuitive introduction to concepts prior to a rigorous examination of them. Proofs are provided for all important theorems. For example, three proofs, one intuitive and two rigorous, are given for the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Also, numerous applications to physics, chemistry, engineering, and business are treated in both the lessons and the problem sets. Use of this text has allowed students to take the Advanced Placement examination and score well. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Course: AP Statistics
Instructor: Sam Wood

Course Description
An introduction to the fundamental methods of data collection and analysis, and how to properly use these methods to draw conclusions about real world applications. The content in this course includes exploratory data analysis, study planning, probability models, and statistical inference. This class is designed for the highly motivated student who has demonstrated excellence in mathematical reasoning and critical thinking. The AP Exam is optional and requires an additional course fee.

Course: Introduction to Statistics
Instructor: Sam Wood

Course Description

Introduction to Statistics will help students of all mathematical backgrounds. Basic statistical concepts and methods are learned in a way that emphasizes understanding the principles of data collection and analysis. Students will learn and discuss displaying and describing data, the normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests with applications in the real world.

Course: Math 87
Instructors: Camille Heiner, Shawnell Larsen, Gail Long, Jeff Meade, Sam Wood

Course Description
This course provides the content the student needs to meet the demands of today’s mathematics curriculum by reinforcing and extending all number sense, computation, pre-algebra, statistics, geometry, and measurement concepts and skills. Students develop proficiency working with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, integers, percents, as well as recognize, use, and express proportional relationships. New concepts are introduced then reinforced with continual practice and as the concept is learned it may then be applied to any situation. The computational work at this level requires the continued building of arithmetic proficiency and to help students maintain strong computational skills, a calculator is rarely utilized. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What problem solving principles can we learn from PEMDAS, and how can we apply it to solving our own life problems?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Course: Pre-Calculus
Instructors: Camille Heiner, Shawnell Larsen, Gail Long, Jeff Meade, Sam Wood

Course Description
In Advanced Mathematics, topics from algebra, geometry, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, and mathematical analysis are interwoven to form a fully integrated text. Specific topics covered in this text include permutations and combinations, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, conic sections, graphs of sinusoids, rectangular and polar representations of complex numbers, De Moivre’s theorem, matrices and determinants, the binomial theorem, and the rational roots theorem. Additionally, a rigorous treatment of Euclidean geometry is presented. Word problems are developed through the problem sets and become progressively more elaborate and difficult. By the end of the text, students will be able to solve competition-level problems with ease. The graphing calculator is studied and used to graph functions and perform data analysis. Also, conceptually-oriented problems that prepare students for college entrance exams (such as the ACT and SAT) are included in the problem sets. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Course: Pre-Algebra
Instructors: Camille Heiner, Shawnell Larsen, Gail Long, Jeff Meade, Sam Wood

Course Description
Pre-Algebra (also known as Algebra 1/2) covers all topics normally taught in Pre-Algebra, as well as additional topics from geometry and discrete mathematics. In Pre-Algebra, students will learn: fractions and their arithmetic operations, decimals and their arithmetic operations, mixed numbers and their arithmetic operations, signed numbers and their arithmetic operations, order of operations, percents, ratios, proportions, divisibility, rounding, place value, unit conversions: scientific notation, evaluation and simplification of algebraic, expressions, the solution of linear equations in one unknown, word problems involving algebraic concepts, graphing, perimeter, area, surface area, volume, classification of geometric figures and solids, geometric construction, and symmetry. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What problem solving principles can we learn from PEMDAS, and how can we apply it to solving our own life problems?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through regular, nearly weekly tests. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to apply concepts through story problems and signed (negative) number operations. To support your student, please consider providing time and support to complete DAILY assignments. Check On-line weekly; if test scores are below 80%, contact the teacher immediately. If math facts are not yet mastered, daily drills are encouraged at home to attain mastery.

Other

Course: ACT Prep
Instructor: David Hancock

Course Description
The ACT Prep class is designed to familiarize students with the test required for admission by many universities. Students will learn test-taking strategies and take practice tests adn learn to decrease anxiety while testing. They will also review English, math, and science content on the ACT test.

Course: Business Fundamentals
Instructor: Chase Hale

Course Description
In this semester-long course, students are exposed to various aspects of organizational administration and management. The course’s content will progress through a general outline. The outline will remain flexible to facilitate certain dynamic factors: consideration of significant current events, the scheduling constraints of guest speakers, and the interests students express at the beginning of the semester. Students will receive a very high-level exposure to several business categories, including but not limited to:
• Accounting
• Economics
• Entrepreneurship
• Finance
• Law
• Leadership
• Marketing/Advertising
• Operations Management
• Organizational Behavior/Human Resources
• Regulation
• Risk Assessment and Mitigation

Students are expected to come to class ready to think critically, ask thoughtful questions, provide thoughtful answers to questions, share relevant experiences and ideas, and otherwise engage in active class participation. Class discussions will be varied by several sources of learning, including:
• Case studies
• Current events
• Guest speakers
• Simulations

Course: Constitutional Studies
Instructor: Jeff Hymas

Course Description
This couse will help students refamiliarize themselves with the actual text of the Constitution and to discover in that great document the timeless principles of freedom upon which our nation was established and our freedom and prosperity were secured. As students in the course learn the foundational principles of freedom found in the Constitution, they will realize how critical and valuable they are and it will affect the way we choose to govern ourselves. When this document is in the hearts and minds of every American, America will once again be the free nation it was founded to be.

Course: Creative Writing
Instructor: Tess Hilmo

Course Description
Students will seek to understand the resources of the English language and understand how they can be employed to communicate aesthetic, moral, and human truths. Students will ask themselves what assumptions, worldviews, and dispositions are involved in writing truthfully. They will strive to understand the difference between heavy-handed didacticism and helping readers experience and arrive at an understanding of truth for themselves.

Course: Dating & Relationships
Instructor: Heidi Crossley

Course Description

This course will focus on interpersonal relations in order to improve social interactions with every child of God be it family members, friends, significant others etc. Topics this course will include are verbal and nonverbal communication, listening, love languages, conflict, genders and cultures, assumption, and self-concept. This course is designed to be a place to practice effective interpersonal skills; therefore, methods such as role-playing, discussion, writing, and observation can be expected.

Course: Debate
Instructor: Ruel Haymond

Course Description
In this course, students will study the principles, tools and techniques of deliberation and persuasion by way of parliamentary procedure, public speaking, courtroom procedure, debate, lobbying and legislation. Upbeat and highly interactive lessons will provide a fun and creative classroom experience while enhancing the student’s memory of the principles taught.
Fall Semester will feature public speaking as a tool for persuasion and influence. Topics covered include effective speech writing, delivery, use of visual aids, handling Q&A and hecklers, the business of speaking and handling the media. Parliamentary procedure will be taught as a tool to prepare students for future leadership and participation in social entrepreneurship. Topics covered include motions, voting, mass meetings, bylaws, elections, order of business in a meeting, minutes, committees, resolutions, and officer duties.

Winter Semester will feature a mock trial as a process for teaching students about the justice system. This exciting courtroom simulation provides an opportunity for students to learn attention to detail, thinking on their feet and the art of persuasion. Topics covered include courtroom players, preparing a case, direct and cross examinations, objections and admission of evidence. Debate, lobbying and legislation will be taught as processes for students to learn to use logic and solid content in a diplomatic, principled and persuasive manner. Topics covered include debate techniques, writing bills, how a bill becomes a law, and lobbying techniques.

Course: Entrepreneurship
Instructor: Travis Lish

Course Description
In this course students will learn how to start coompanies through various activities such as startup simulation games, design thinking, undersatnding marketing and finance, and meeting with various entrepreneurs in Utah County. Students will gain the confidence and skills to turn their research and ideas into reality. Each student will gain a deeper understanding of their divine potential to become creators by practiciting the design process and creating a business model that htey will be preapred to carry out. By working together in teams, meetin gsuccessful entrepreneurs, and applying entrepreneurial principles, students will be better preapred to serve their community.

Course: Financial Literacy
Instructor: Blaine Hunsaker

Course Description
In this course, students will learn about sound principles of financial success. Course material and content will be drawn from the counsel of the prophets and apostles, renowned financial expert Dave Ramsey, and Brian Nelson Ford— author of The 8 Pillars of Financial Greatness. Students will be introduced to the 8 Pillars of Financial Greatness as outlined in Brian’s book. The primary methods of instruction will be though reading materials and classroom discussion. Students will also have the opportunity to use 8 Pillars.com and its various calculators and worksheets, designed to enhance their learning. In addition to being able to discuss these topics, students will demonstrate their understanding through the 4-R (research, reason, relate, and record) methodology, word studies, short quizzes, and short papers. The most reliable way for parents to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through On-line. For many students the most challenging part of class is to create a realistic budget. To support your student, please consider reviewing materials sent home with your student. Talking with your student about how to budget would also be useful to your student. From time to time please ask them to share principles they learned in class with your family. When students become the teacher they learn the most!

Course: Food & Nutrition
Instructor: Stephanie Bigelow

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Journalism 1 and 2
Instructor: Tess Hilmo

Course Description
Journalism 1: The students in this class will comprise various editorial desks including Features, Sports, Arts and Entertainment, Patriot Community, and Health and Wellness. Students will collaborate, investigate, research, compose and present articles for publication in the bi-monthly newsletter. Journalism 2: The students in this class will comprise various editorial desks including Managing Editor, Associate Editor, Opinion, Photo, Poll, Additional Features, College and Career, and Advice Column. Students will collaborate, investigate, research, compose and present articles for publication. Further, students in this class will oversee the managerial responsibilities of the newspaper staff. They will have the opportunity to experience a greater breadth and depth of learning by acting as a mentor for and teaching specific curriculum aspects to the Journalism 1 students. Finally, Journalism 2 students will be required to read additional texts regarding nonfiction writing and will compose a creative nonfiction piece as part of their final exam. Scheduling Note: This course is taught at the same time as the Journalism 1 course, by the same teacher and in the same room.

Course: Principles of Leadership
Instructor: Grant Beckwith

Course Description
In Principles of Leadership students will explore thematic questions such as:
• In what ways is leadership an “inside-out” skill?
• How is leadership a creative skill? In other words, what roles do imagination, vision, and creativity play in the governance and managerial tasks of leadership?
• What is your personal mission statement, and how does a clear vision of that statement inform your roles in life, your short- and long-term goals, and even your weekly and daily tasks?
• With all that you have learned about the science and the art of leadership, how would you rate yourself as a leader? Do you agree with Spencer Kimball that Jesus was “the perfect leader?” Why or why not?
The major theme of the Principles of Leadership and Personal Management Course will be “Creation” taken from the Book of Genesis and from the Pearl of Great Price, focusing on the topics of “Spiritual Creation” and “Physical Creation”. In addition, students will also do service and other field learning activities in context of subthemes taken from an address by President Spencer W. Kimball, entitled “Jesus: The Perfect Leader” focusing on the Christian leadership skills of “Understanding Others”, “Selfless Leadership”, “Responsibility”, “Accountability”, “Wise Use of Time”, “Secular Leadership”, and “Infinite Potential” (See “Jesus: The Perfect Leader”, Spencer W. Kimball, Ensign, Aug. 1979, 5). The primary methods of instruction will be selected readings and field learning activities, including visits to the Brigham Young University Office of Student Leadership, Honor Code Office, Marriott School of Management, J. Reuben Clark Law School, and others. In addition to being able to discuss these topics, students will demonstrate their understanding through a class community service-learning project and an individual final presentation that each student will create. The most reliable way for parents to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students the most challenging part of class is the final presentation, which will require them to create a brief PowerPoint presentation distilling leadership and community.

Course: Student Government
Instructor: Jeff Hymas

Course Description
Students will learn to apply the principles of leadership amongst their peers as elected student body, and class-specific, officers. Students will plan and execute school-wide activities as an independent and autonomous group – including control and accountability over budgets. Students will learn how to communicate effectively, work efficiently, and coordinate efforts to create the activities and events that their fellow classmates will enjoy with them.

Course: Financial Literacy
Instructor: Blaine Hunsaker

Course Description
In this course, students will learn about sound principles of financial success. Course material and content will be drawn from the counsel of the prophets and apostles, renowned financial expert Dave Ramsey, and Brian Nelson Ford — author of ‘The 8 Pillars of Financial Greatness’. and the self-reliance couse produced by the LDS church. Students will be introduced to the 8 Pillars of Financial Greatness as outlined in Brian’s book. The primary methods of instruction will be through reading materials and classroom discussion. Students will also have the opportunity to use various online calculators, worksheets and other online resources designed to enhance their learning. In addition to being able to discuss these topics, student will demonstrate their understanding through the 4-R (research, reason, relate and record) methodology, word studies, short quizzes, and short writing assignments. The most reliable way for parents to receive specific information about course work, including topics and times, is through Veracross. For many students the most challenging part of the class is to create a realistic budget. To support your student, please consider reviewing materials sent home with your student. Taking with your student about how to budget would also be useful to your student. From time to time please ask them to share principles they learned in class with your family. When student become the teacher ty learn the most!

P.E.

Course: Athletic Conditioning
Instructor: Brian Smith

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Basketball Fundamentals
Instructor: Brian Smith

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Ballroom-Advanced (Competition)
Instructor: Barbara McOmber

Course Description
This course is designed to give students an advanced technical and intellectual experience. It covers many forms of American, Latin, and International Ballroom, in addition to an exposure to other forms of partnered dance, such as Contemporary, Classic Ballet, and Cabaret. Students will be required to practice alone and with a partner outside of class as homework. The students will attend local and state competitions held in Utah valley. They will also perform at the school regular school events, in addition to a few community events.

Course: Ballroom-Advanced (Performance)
Instructor: Barbara McOmber

Course Description
This course is designed to give students an advanced technical and intellectual experience. It covers many forms of American, Latin, and International Ballroom, in addition to providing exposure to other forms of partnered dance, such as Contemporary, Classic Ballet, and Jazz. Students will be required to practice alone and with a partner outside of class as homework. The course is focused on service through performance. Students will perform for both the school and the community.

Course: Social Dance
Instructor: Barbara McOmber

Course Description
In this course, students will acquire technical and intellectual expertise in American and Latin social dances. Students will learn how developing a new talent can have a positive effect on the community and can create opportunities for service. Students will learn social skills and etiquette and develop a desire for continuing participation in social dance events while demonstrating Christ-like conduct (see American Heritage Mission Statement, point #7). The student will also gain an appreciation for the art of dance and how it may be utilized to help build the kingdom of God (see American Heritage Mission Statement, point #1). Students will learn through classroom demonstration, classroom practice, rehearsal, and teacher guided discussion of dance history and rhythmic concepts. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through written exams; technique evaluations by the teacher; self-assessments; written evaluations of an outside dance concert; participation in AHS Ballroom Showcase; participation in regional dance competition, research of videos, books, scriptures, and talks about how dance may help build the kingdom of God; and a written record of their findings in their notebook. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through email from the instructor. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to remember dance sequences, master different ballroom styles, and exude self-confidence while performing. To support your student, please consider reviewing with your student on a daily basis the individual steps, names of steps, and the performance dances learned in class. Copies of music for home-practice may be obtained by request.

Course: Ballroom-Intermediate
Instructor: Barbara McOmber

Course Description
Intermediate Ballroom is designed to give students more advanced technical and intellectual experience in American and Latin social dances. Students will learn how developing a new talent can have a positive effect on the community and can create opportunities for service. Students will learn social skills and etiquette and develop a desire for continuing participation in social dance events while demonstrating Christ-like conduct (American Heritage Mission Statement, point #7). The student will also gain an appreciation for the art of dance and how it may be utilized to help build the kingdom of God (American Heritage Mission Statement, point #1) through classroom demonstration, practice, rehearsal, and teacher-guided discussion of dance history and rhythmic concepts. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through participation in dance competitions involving other local schools; written exams; technique evaluations by teacher; self-assessments; written evaluations of an outside dance concert; participation in AHS Ballroom Showcase, which will include a student-choreographed sections of the routine; research of videos, books, scriptures, and talks concerning how dance may help build the kingdom of God; and recording findings in a notebook. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through email from the teacher. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to remember dance sequences, master different ballroom styles, and exude self-confidence while performing. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to remember dance sequences, master different ballroom styles, and exude self-confidence while performing. To support your student, please consider reviewing with your student on a daily basis the individual steps, names of steps, and the performance dances learned in class. Copies of music for home-practice may be obtained by request.

Course: Boys Physical Education
Instructor: Brian Smith

Course Description
In this course, students will learn teamwork, sportsmanship, honesty, tolerance, flexibility, attitude, cooperation, self-discipline, and determination through a variety of individual and team sports and games such as ultimate Frisbee, soccer, flag football, dodge ball, basketball, kickball, capture the flag, etc. Students will also spend one day a week individually pushing themselves through conditioning exercises. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How can individually pushing your physical body help your mental strength? How can individually activities lead to better teamwork? How can you use the idea of teamwork in your life, in your family, and in your class?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through active participation in the scheduled sport, game or activity. To support your student, please consider encouraging your child to be physically active thirty – sixty minutes each day and encourage your child to set and work toward a goal.

Course: 8th Grade Boys/Girls Physical Education
Instructor: Lacey Olpin (girls) and Brian Smith (boys)

Course Description
In this course, students will learn teamwork, sportsmanship, honesty, tolerance, flexibility, attitude, cooperation, self-discipline, and determination through a variety of individual and team sports and games such as ultimate Frisbee, soccer, flag football, dodge ball, basketball, kickball, capture the flag, etc. Students will also spend one day a week individually pushing themselves through conditioning exercises. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How can individually pushing your physical body help your mental strength? How can individually activities lead to better teamwork? How can you use the idea of teamwork in your life, in your family, and in your class?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through active participation in the scheduled sport, game or activity. To support your student, please consider encouraging your child to be physically active thirty – sixty minutes each day and encourage your child to set and work toward a goal.

Course: 7th Grade Boys/Girls Physical Education
Instructor: Brian Smith and Stephanie Bigelow

Course Description
In this course, students will learn teamwork, sportsmanship, honesty, tolerance, flexibility, attitude, cooperation, self-discipline, and determination through a variety of individual and team sports and games such as ultimate Frisbee, soccer, flag football, dodge ball, basketball, kickball, capture the flag, etc. Students will also spend one day a week individually pushing themselves through conditioning exercises. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How can individually pushing your physical body help your mental strength? How can individually activities lead to better teamwork? How can you use the idea of teamwork in your life, in your family, and in your class?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through active participation in the scheduled sport, game or activity. To support your student, please consider encouraging your child to be physically active thirty – sixty minutes each day and encourage your child to set and work toward a goal.

Course: Health
Instructor: Stephanie Bigelow

Course Description
In this course, students will learn about their bodies as temples of God, maintaining a healthy physical, mental and spiritual lifestyle (including wellness topics such as stretching and exercise, healthy eating, the effects of harmful substances, first aid, family recreation, managing stress, healthy sleeping, understanding and preventing heart attacks and cancer, and the interconnectedness of body, mind, and spirit), through the Standard Works and words of modern prophets and apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the study and application of wellness topics. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How does the consistent training you are learning help you prepare for your mission in life?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through quizzes on wellness topics and goal setting opportunities. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to implement what they learn about wellness topics.

Course: Mixed Physical Education -9-12
Instructor: Stephanie Bigelow and Brian Smith

Course Description
This course provides students with an opportunity to develop their strength as well as condition for various sports and fitness-related activities. Conditioning activities are incorporated to enhance strength, endurance, balance, agility, and speed. We will enjoy playing a multitude of sports and gain a lifelong love of athletics. In this course, students will also learn teamwork, sportsmanship, honesty, tolerance, flexibility, attitude, cooperation, self-discipline, and determination through a variety of individual and team sports and games such as ultimate Frisbee, soccer, flag football, dodge ball, basketball, kickball, capture the flag, etc. Students will also spend one day a week individually pushing themselves through conditioning exercises. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How can individually pushing your physical body help your mental strength? How can individually activities lead to better teamwork? How can you use the idea of teamwork in your life, in your family, and in your class?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through active participation in the scheduled sport, game or activity. To support your student, please consider encouraging your child to be physically active thirty – sixty minutes each day and encourage your child to set and work toward a goal.

Course: Volleyball Fundamentals
Instructor: Brian Smith

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Womens Yoga
Instructor: Chrisann Patch

Course Description
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of vinyasa yoga flow, focusing on correct breathing, body alignment and developing the art of being “present” in their practice. The course will equip students with the tools to develop their own home yoga practice safely. There are no assignments, but there is one multiple-choice, year-end theory test constituting 20% of the Term 4 grade. Expected homework load is 30 minutes per week of ashtanga yoga theory study.

Course: Womens Yoga 8
Instructor: Chrisann Patch

Course Description
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of vinyasa yoga flow, focusing on correct breathing, body alignment and developing the art of being “present” in their practice. The course will equip students with the tools to develop their own home yoga practice safely. There are no assignments, but there is one multiple-choice, year-end theory test constituting 20% of the Term 4 grade. Expected homework load is 30 minutes per week of ashtanga yoga theory study.

Course: 8th Grade Ballroom
Instructor: Barbara McOmber

Course Description
In this course, students will acquire technical and intellectual expertise in American and Latin social dances. Students will learn how developing a new talent can have a positive effect on the community and can create opportunities for service. Students will learn social skills and etiquette and develop a desire for continuing participation in social dance events while demonstrating Christ-like conduct (see American Heritage Mission Statement, point #7). The student will also gain an appreciation for the art of dance and how it may be utilized to help build the kingdom of God (see American Heritage Mission Statement, point #1). Students will learn through classroom demonstration, classroom practice, rehearsal, and teacher guided discussion of dance history and rhythmic concepts. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through written exams; technique evaluations by the teacher; self-assessments; written evaluations of an outside dance concert; participation in AHS Ballroom Showcase; participation in regional dance competition, research of videos, books, scriptures, and talks about how dance may help build the kingdom of God; and a written record of their findings in their notebook. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through email from the instructor. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to remember dance sequences, master different ballroom styles, and exude self-confidence while performing. To support your student, please consider reviewing with your student on a daily basis the individual steps, names of steps, and the performance dances learned in class. Copies of music for home-practice may be obtained by request.

Course: Athletic Conditioning
Instructor: Brian Smith

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Performing Arts

Course: A Capella Choir
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s lifelong ability to meaningfully interact with diverse styles of music and find personal satisfaction in group music-making experiences. Singing will be the primary mode by which this purpose is realized. Course content will include:
• Group vocal technique
• Rehearsal and performance skills
• Solo/small ensemble performance
• Music literacy (reading and writing notation, musical terms and symbols)
• Individual musicianship (sol fa, dictation, critical listening, etc.)

Course: AP Music Theory
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description
This class will help students prepare to take the AP Music Theory test. The goal of AP Music Theory is to develop each student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard and presented in a score. The course focuses on the development of five fundamental skills:
1. Aural skills (recognizing intervals, scales, modes, rhythms, meters and other musical elements)
2. Sight-singing skills (reading music at first sight through the use of tonic sol-fa singing)
3. Written skills (learning and applying principles harmony, voice leading from the common practice period)
4. Compositional skills (creating original music that follows compositional practices of the common practice period)
5. Analytical skills (examining written music to discover the compositional elements that make it what it is)
Students who take this course should already have a basic understanding of music notation and should be able to sing or play a musical instrument. Since sight singing is part of the AP Music Theory exam, students will be required to sing. AP Music Theory is a college-level course. Consequently, the quality and quantity of work required will be greater than an average high school class.

Course: Chamber Choir
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description
For students in grades 11 and 12. No more than sixteen advanced choir students with performance opportunities throughout the year including Christmas on Temple Square and Region/State Choir Festival. Chamber Choir members also have opportunities to participate in the Utah All-State and Honor Choirs.

Course: Drama 1
Instructor: Johanne Perry

Course Description
This beginning acting course will cover basic acting terminologies and definitions, techniques of movement, voice, and script analysis with a strong emphasis on performance. This will be taught through a wide variety of drama games and activities. The students will also be presenting multiple memorized scenes which they will present to their peers in the class for critique. Various scene performance due dates will be posted on the Parent Portal.

Course: Drama 2
Instructor: Johanne Perry

Course Description
Prerequisite for this class is Drama 1. If you have not previously taken Drama 1, you will be asked to drop the class. This is an advanced drama course that will explore acting techniques through voice and body work and many memorized scenes and monologues to be presented to the class for critique. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
How can exploring the human experience through theatre enrich my understanding of myself and the world in which I live?
The course will include the usual drama games, an introduction to stage makeup, and each student will also be required to present a musical selection assigned by the instructor. At the end of the semester the class will present a performance during class time for invited teachers, classmates, and parents, of selected class scenes. The only homework for this course is memorization of the assigned scenes and monologues. Due dates will be posted on the Parent Portal.

Course: Drama 8
Instructor: Johanne Perry

Course Description
In this one term, once a week course, students will learn a few basics of acting techniques for stage performance. This will include theater vocabulary, understanding how to use the body and the voice in acting, and a memorized, one minute monologue. The students will also be required to audition for the Shakespeare show that will begin rehearsals second term. If not selected for the cast, then another elective will need to be chosen for Term 2. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• How can exploring the human experience through theatre enrich my understanding of myself and the world in which I live?
The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through the Parent Portal. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to get the memorization done on time. To support your student, please consider having them do five minutes each day of memorization.

Course: High School Choir
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Instrumental Music
Instructor: Rob Swenson/Vicki McMurray

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Mens Choir 7
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s lifelong ability to meaningfully interact with diverse styles of music and find personal satisfaction in group music-making experiences. Although singing will be a large component of the class, a broad range of other musically enriching experiences will be provided to aid in accomplishing this goal. The major components of the class are:
1. SINGING
• Developing correct vocal technique
• Rehearsing and performing music as a group
2. LISTENING
• Increasing critical listening skills (musical mapping and other diagraming activities)
• Identifying and describing musical elements (form, timbre, duration, etc.)
3. CREATING
• Composing original musical works
• Arranging pre-existing music in a creative way
4. CONDUCTING
• Acquiring the skills necessary for effective communication as a conductor in church and other settings
• Developing effective leadership skills in music making situations (leading music rehearsals)
5. THINKING
• Discussing the role of music in building God’s kingdom
• Listening to and critiquing diverse kinds of music
• Making wise musical decisions (“What music helps me become more like my Father in Heaven?”)
6. READING
• Learning to read and write musical notation
• Learning fundamental terminology, signs, and symbols of written music

Course: Mens Choir 8
Instructor: Rob Swenson

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s lifelong ability to meaningfully interact with diverse styles of music and find personal satisfaction in group music-making experiences. Singing will be the primary mode by which this purpose is realized. Course content will include:

  • Group vocal technique
  • Rehearsal and performance skills
  • Solo/small ensemble performance
  • Music literacy (reading and writing notation, musical terms and symbols)
  • Individual musicianship (sol fa, dictation, critical listening, etc.)

Course: Play Performance Production
Instructor: Johanne Perry

Course Description
This is a class for students who wish to perform in an all-school play, offered second semester. During class, students rehearse and stage a formal production for evening performances in May. The class provides an opportunity for students in sports or other after-school related activities to participate in a drama production. Students may be required to provide their own costumes, hand props, and make-up, with assistance from the Theatre Department. After school rehearsals, plus a Saturday rehearsal will be mandatory during the final week before performances. Auditions are before the start of Term 3 in order to have time for class schedule changes.

Course: Public Speaking and Presentation
Instructor: Johanne Perry

Course Description
In this introductory course students have an opportunity to gain skill, confidence, and fluency in public speaking. Students develop an understanding of both basic communication principles and public speaking s Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• Why is having good presentation skills an essential element for your future?
trategies through their application of these principles to a variety of speaking assignments. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including speech topics, notes, and due dates, is through the Parent Portal. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to be comfortable presenting speeches to peers. To support your student, please consider allowing them to practice their speeches in front of you. The speeches will also need to be timed.
Publishable or Significant Projects: Speech topics include: How To Remember My Name, Graduation, Celebration of You, Commemorative, Hero, LDS Conference Excerpts, plus various impromptu subjects.

Memorizations:  Memorization is optional; however, the first line of every speech is required.

Course: Stage Craft
Instructor: Jay Clark

Course Description
Technical Theater is stage craft, audio, video, lighting, set design, lighting design, and everything else that goes into a production or event, except acting. Students will explore and gain both basic and advanced skills in each area, through hands-on work and real world evaluations on school events both on and off campus. Students will also use power tools such as circular saws, power drills and drivers, wrenches and hydraulic lifts.

Skills learned in class enhance student’s capabilities as audio engineers, designers, corporate event producers, church productions and videos, including knowledge of home electronics and how they work. This class requiers teacher permission to take.

Course: Theater Arts & Dramatic Improvisation
Instructor: Jake Earnest

Course Description
In this course students will gain an appreciation for an aspect of theatrical performance known as improv. The experience will suppot student’s abilities to listen, react, and create in positive ways that influence theatrical performance, life relationships, and cultivation of proper humor. This will be done thorugh the dtailed instruction on improv, participation in “theatre games” geared towards the support of improvisation skills. Students will create their own characters to perform and participate in “improv everywhere” exercises.

Course: Womens Choir 7
Instructor: Vicki McMurray

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s lifelong ability to meaningfully interact with diverse styles of music and find personal satisfaction in group music-making experiences. Although singing will be a large component of the class, a broad range of other musically enriching experiences will be provided to aid in accomplishing this goal. The major components of the class are:
1. SINGING
• Developing correct vocal technique
• Rehearsing and performing music as a group
2. LISTENING
• Increasing critical listening skills (musical mapping and other diagraming activities)
• Identifying and describing musical elements (form, timbre, duration, etc.)
3. CREATING
• Composing original musical works
• Arranging pre-existing music in a creative way
4. CONDUCTING
• Acquiring the skills necessary for effective communication as a conductor in church and other settings
• Developing effective leadership skills in music making situations (leading music rehearsals)
5. THINKING
• Discussing the role of music in building God’s kingdom
• Listening to and critiquing diverse kinds of music
• Making wise musical decisions (“What music helps me become more like my Father in Heaven?”)
6. READING
• Learning to read and write musical notation
• Learning fundamental terminology, signs, and symbols of written music

Course: Womens Choir 8
Instructor: Vicki McMurray

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s lifelong ability to meaningfully interact with diverse styles of music and find personal satisfaction in group music-making experiences. Singing will be the primary mode by which this purpose is realized. Course content will include:

• Group vocal technique

• Rehearsal and performance skills

• Solo/small ensemble performance

• Music literacy (reading and writing notation, musical terms and symbols)

• Individual musicianship (sol fa, dictation, critical listening, etc.)

Science

Course: AP Biology
Instructor: Rohan Adams

Course Description
In AP Biology, an emphasis is on students making connections between the big ideas within the AP Biology Curriculum Framework. This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level biology course, and it is designed to prepare students for the AP Biology Exam. The course philosophy is to actively engage students in the process of science through class assignments and discussions which inform their laboratory experiences. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What are some ways that you interact with the natural world?
• What are some factors that help you maintain homeostasis internally and externally?
Lab techniques are learned through researching journal papers, hands-on labs which make up at least 25% of instructional time, and at least two field trips to various working labs in the state. Labs emphasize development and testing of the hypothesis, collection, analysis and presentation of data, as well as discussion of results to discover unanswered questions about the particular topics addressed. A minimum of two labs in each big idea will be conducted. Students are required to report on all laboratory investigations through a lab notebook, class presentations, mini-poster and tests. The student-directed and inquiry-based laboratory investigations used throughout the course enable students to apply the seven science practices as defined in the Curriculum Framework.

Course: AP Chemistry
Instructor: Kristin Domike

Course Description
AP Chemistry is a challenging college level course in general chemistry. As such, students should have successfully completed high school level chemistry and two years of algebra before taking AP Chemistry. Students should also expect to dedicate approximately five hours outside of class each week to completing assignments and lab reports and studying for the AP exam. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What models can help us understand the composition, properties, and interactions of matter?
• How can scientific skills and principles improve our lives?
The big ideas covered in this course are (1) atomic structure, (2) structure-property relations, (3) transformations, (4) kinetics, (5) thermodynamics, and (6) equilibrium. Students will perform several hands-on laboratory investigations that not only teach these big ideas but also help them practice essential science skills. The science practices that will be emphasized are (1) using models, (2) using mathematics, (3) engaging in scientific questioning, (4) collecting data, (5) analyzing data, (6) using scientific theories, (7) and relating knowledge across domains.

Course: AP Physics
Instructor: Alex DeBirk

Course Description
This course prepares students to pass the AP Physics 1 Exam and gain corresponding college credit. Through group work and experiments, the class will explore Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Most importantly, students will develop intuitive understanding of these phenomena and the way mathematics describe and harness them. The AP Exam is optional and requires an additional course fee.

Course: Biology
Instructor: Ryan Anderson

Course Description
The major course topics that will be taught during this class are the following: definition of life, creation of life, purpose of life, different types of plants, animals, and other forms of life, their interactions and co-existence in the world. Students will explore key thematic questions such as, “In what ways does understanding the natural world and its processes enrich your life?” Scholars will be able to effectively communicate important biological concepts and principles with correct terminology. Scholars will learn through independent and group study in addition to traditional instruction. A focus on student directed learning through independent study will take the place of any assigned homework. We will still cover all essential concepts in class. The only Biology homework will be student directed as they increase their depth of knowledge on a topic of self-interest and record their discoveries. We will become “generalists” in the classroom and encourage students to become specialists in very specific areas of interest to themselves. Topics will be taught through lecture, hands-on experiments and labs, assessments and student created reports and projects. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through a Science Fair project and creation of a student notebook, an experiment lab book, and word studies. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to create their Science Fair project and report. To support your student, please consider helping students dedicate approximately three hours per week to the study of Biology through assignments, reports, or study of the material.

Course: Chemistry
Instructor: Rohan Adams

Course Description
In this course, students will learn about the elements, interactions of the elements, chemical equations, and properties of chemical reactions through lecture, hands-on experiments and labs, assessments, and student-created reports and projects. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What models can help us understand the composition, properties, and interactions of matter?
• How can scientific skills and principles improve our lives?
In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics by a Science Fair project and creation of a student notebook, an experiment lab book, and word studies. The most reliable way to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is on-line. For many students, the most challenging part of class is to create their Science Fair project and report, and master chemical equations. To support your student, please consider preparing your student to dedicate approximately four hours per week to the study of Chemistry through assignments, reports, or study of the material.

Course: Genetics
Instructor: Rohan Adams

Course Description
Coming Soon!

Course: Intro to Engineering
Instructor: Alex DeBirk

Course Description
Introduction to Engineering exposes its students to the many different types of engineering careers, such as: civil, mechanical, electrical, computer, and nuclear engineering; construction practices; and drafting. Instruction is highly dependent on hands-on, student-led, and project based assignments. This class also covers the concept of engineering itself: solving problems.

Course: Medical Anatomy & Physiology
Instructor: Ryan Anderson

Course Description
In this course, students will learn to effectively communicate important human anatomy and physiology concepts and principles with correct terminology. Scholars will learn through independent and group study in addition to traditional instruction. A focus on student directed learning through independent study will take the place of any assigned homework. We will still cover all essential concepts in class. The only homework will be student directed as they increase their depth of knowledge on a topic of self interest and record their discoveries. We will become “generalists” in the classroom and encourage students to become specialists in very specific areas of interest to themselves. Students will also learn to apply the 7 Principles of Personal and Civil Liberty to learning biology. Finally, scholars will prepare to enter higher division coursework by successfully completing this course.

Course: Medical Terminology
Instructor: Ryan Anderson

Course Description
This half credit, introductory course, will place emphasis upon word roots, suffixes, prefixes, abbreviations, symbols, anatomical terms, and terms associated with movements of the human body. This course also stresses the proper pronunciation, spelling, and usage of medical terminology. This class will provide a basis of terminology used in a wide variety of future health care related occupations.

Course: Physics
Instructor: Alex DeBirk

Course Description
Physics is a yearlong course intended for those students who want an algebra-based, college-level physics course while in high school. Students will be engaged with analogies and imagery from real-world situations to build a strong conceptual understanding of physical principles ranging from classical mechanics to modern physics including thermodynamics, light, sound and electromagnetism. With this strong conceptual foundation, students are better equipped to understand the equations and formulas of physics, and to make connections between the concepts of physics and their everyday world.

Course: Science 7
Instructor: Jolyn Mitchell

Course Description
In this course students will focus on these areas; cell biology, heredity and genetics and classification of life. The units will explore man’s observed knowledge of science systems and how it relates to Heavenly Father’s creations and His plan for us. The year will begin with the basics of science, the tools of science, and the scientific method (a way of knowing) as well as procedural methods for the class. Students will then study cell biology, including the structure of the cell, its organelles and their individual structure and function. Then, students will have a genetic unit including an introduction to heredity, its beginnings as a science and the function and structure of DNA and that offspring inherit traits for survival and adaptability best suited for environments. Finally, students will learn about classification which consists of the basis of life’s nomenclatures and how observation and structure play a part. They will learn how to create a simple classification system and how to recognize order and pattern in God’s world. Students will learn how to use a dichotomous key and will learn about types of trees and visit an arboretum. The curriculum for each area will deal with the basic understanding of each discipline. Emphasis will be on understanding basic laws and not concentrated on complex mathematical formulas that form the basis for each area of study. Our concentration will be on students’ observing, experimenting, and drawing conclusions for themselves. As with all AHS science classes, the most important theme is developing a complete understanding of Heavenly Father’s divine hand in the creation of all things and the tying of science and faith together in a manner that will support students throughout their life regardless of where their education or vocation may take them. The focus will be on physical in general terms rather than the more specific. We will study individual laws, forces, and concepts for their characteristics and role in Heavenly Fathers design for our world and universe. We want students to become familiar with the miraculous universe designed for the eternal mission we have been given as set forth in the scriptures.

The methods of instruction that will be used in the classroom are the didactic, application methods, intellectual discussion and inquiry based learning and labs. Vocabulary will be taught directly and through contextual format. Assessments will include tests and quizzes, writing assignments, word studies, projects, and other activities. Grading of assessments will be on a 100-point scale and can be viewed on Veracross. Each class always begins with prayer and a scripture that is linked to the subject being taught. Presentations are designed in compliance with the 4R method (research, reason, relate and record.) Each student will have a notebook that they are responsible for, and the notebook will be graded. In concert with handouts, this notebook will become their textbooks. In addition to being able to discuss the topics students will demonstrate their understanding through short exams given after each section of study. There will be no end of term exam. All seventh grade students will have a yearlong project of taking 15 pictures having to do with physics. A brief explanation of the concept demonstrated will also be required. This will be due the week BEFORE the last week of school. Detailed instructions will be posted on On-line and a handout sent home with the instructions requiring a parent’s signature. The most reliable way for parents to receive specific information about course work, including topics and timing, is through reviewing the student’s science folder once a week to see how well they are progressing. For many students the most challenging part of class is to ensure that science not become more complicated than it really is at this point in their academic career. If this becomes the case, or your student has special needs (i.e. they can’t read the board or hear the teacher speak, please let the teacher know so proper arrangements may be made for them. To support your student, please consider dedicating 15 to twenty minutes a week (split up) to discuss what they have learned, what they may be confused about, or what they think of the classroom environment. Please have them bring home their notebook at least twice a term to review it with them for completeness and neatness.

Course: Science 8
Instructor: Jolyn Mitchell

Course Description
In this course students will focus on four areas; earth systems and processes, Biomes and ecosystems, chemistry and chemical processes and physical science. The units will explore man’s observed knowledge of science systems and how it relates to Heavenly Father’s creations and His plan for us. The units will explore man’s observed knowledge of science systems and how it relates to Heavenly Father’s creations and His plan for us. Students will explore key thematic questions such as:
• What physical processes recycle earth’s matter?
• What are the ecological factors that define a region or biome?
• What elements define our physical earth and beyond?
• How do the laws of nature relate to spiritual laws?
The year will begin with the basics of science, the tools of science and the scientific method as well as procedural methods for the class and the seven principles. Students will be taught through the 4R-ing method – Research, Reason, Relate and Record. Students will keep a notebook of the work generated throughout the year for record of the concepts covered in class. Homework will be given as well as class presentations and group projects.
Other units will be life science which will include investigations on biomes of the world and plant structure and function, how plants obtain and use energy, photosynthesis, understanding dependent relationships among organisms, and analyzing human influences on the environment. It will also include how plants function and adapt to their biomes and interact with the animals in their ecosystems and scientists who have careers in these fields. Life science will be followed by earth science which will include the rock cycle as well as comparison of rocks and minerals, how rock changes over time, how fossils are evidence of earth’s history and the comparison of rapid and gradual changes to earth’s surface. Investigations will also include plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes, weathering and other processes that shape and form the earth. Instruction will include the geography of earth as compared to other celestial bodies and scientists who have careers in the earth science field. Additionally, students will study physical science which will include the investigation of various forms of energy and the transfer of energy through various materials. It will also include, force, motion and gravity and the application of these concepts on objects and scientists who have careers in physical science. Finally, students will study chemistry which will include a review of the periodic table and atomic structure as well as chemical bonding, chemical reactions and compounds and the application of this knowledge as well as scientists that have careers in chemistry. It will also include lab investigations on chemical bonding and reactions.

Instructional methods will consist of the didactic, application methods, intellectual discussion, inquiry based learning, projects and labs. Vocabulary will be taught directly and through contextual format. Assessments will include tests and quizzes, writing assignments, projects, word studies and labs and other appropriate tasks.